gabrielle zevin

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Gabrielle Zevin has published six novels. Her debut, Margarettown, was a selection of the Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers program. The Hole We’re In was on Entertainment Weekly's Must List and was a New York Times Editor’s Choice. Entertainment Weekly wrote, "Every day newspaper articles chronicle families battered by the recession, circling the drain in unemployment and debt or scraping by with minimum-wage jobs. But no novel has truly captured that struggle until now." Publishers Weekly called the novel "a Corrections for our recessionary times."

Of all her books, she is probably best known for the young adult novel Elsewhere. Elsewhere, an American Library Association Notable Children’s Book, was nominated for a Quill Award and received the Borders Original Voices Award. The book has been translated into over twenty languages. Of Elsewhere, the New York Times Book Review wrote, “Every so often a book comes along with a premise so fresh and arresting it seems to exist in a category all its own... Elsewhere, by Gabrielle Zevin, is such a book.”

She is the screenwriter of Conversations with Other Women (Helena Bonham Carter, Aaron Eckhart) for which she received an Independent Spirit Award Nomination. In 2009, she and director Hans Canosa adapted her novel Memoirs of a Teenage Amnesiac (ALA Best Books for Young Adults) into the Japanese film, Dareka ga Watashi ni Kiss wo Shita. She has also written for the New York Times Book Review and NPR’s All Things Considered. She began her writing career at age fourteen as a music critic for the Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel.

Zevin is a graduate of Harvard University. After many years on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, she recently moved to Silver Lake, Los Angeles.

Find her online at gabriellezevin.com.

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Posts tagged tuesday hijinks

tuesday hijinks no. 10: Printers Row Book Festival in Chicago, suitcase postmortem
Notes:
1. I packed my red shoes but did not wear them. They make the photo because they go well with the ARC of Because It Is My Blood.
2. I bought the print at the festival. The verse reads:
Lady Tulip, stately dame,
From across the ocean came;
Liked this country very much,
Although she only spoke in Dutch.
This puts me in mind of a few lyrics I like from a Bright Eyes song called “Road to Joy.”
I could have been a famous singer
If I had someone else’s voice
But failure always sounded better
Let’s f*** it up, boys, make some noise.
Zoom Info

tuesday hijinks no. 10: Printers Row Book Festival in Chicago, suitcase postmortem

Notes:

1. I packed my red shoes but did not wear them. They make the photo because they go well with the ARC of Because It Is My Blood.

2. I bought the print at the festival. The verse reads:

Lady Tulip, stately dame,

From across the ocean came;

Liked this country very much,

Although she only spoke in Dutch.


This puts me in mind of a few lyrics I like from a Bright Eyes song called “Road to Joy.”

I could have been a famous singer

If I had someone else’s voice

But failure always sounded better

Let’s f*** it up, boys, make some noise.

(more Tuesday hijinks on Monday after an extended absence from the hijinks scene; it is not that I have had no hijinks, but perhaps that the spring has been altogether too hijinksical to even be reported)
tuesday hijinks, no. 9: scenes from the Rochester Teen Book Festival. I wish I could send my teenage self a time machine so I could go to this thing. 
1. Cat Patrick, my co-presenter for the weekend. Forgotten is about to become my go-to recommend for teens. Ask her about the sign language troop she was in. Seriously, ask her. 
2. I’d say that a handmade “Holden Caulfield thinks you’re a phony” t-shirt is just about the perfect thing to wear to a teen book festival. 
3. Handmade book earrings. These Rochester Teen Book Festival attendees are seriously crafty.
4. Gran Torino. The authors were driven in classic cars to the event, and I’d really prefer to always be driven to events this way. The driver’s name I have forgotten, but he was a former shop teacher and an excellent guide. The profile belongs to James Kennedy, who travels with a tuxedo and is the shyest writer you will ever meet. 
4. A.S. King & Squid. I liked the both of them immediately. 
5. My answer was “A Kitten.” Melissa Walker’s answer was “Grace Kelly.” What was the question? 
6. The majestic head of Terry Trueman.
7. Jack Ferraiolo will kill you with his star. (I lost mine somewhere, by the way, but that is the way with stars.)
Thanks to all the incredible volunteers at the Rochester Teen Book Festival. This event somehow concentrates all that is good about writing for teenagers into a single day. I wish I had taken more pictures, but I am photographically-challenged.
P.S. I’ll be signing bright and early at BEA tomorrow for anyone who’s around.
Zoom Info
(more Tuesday hijinks on Monday after an extended absence from the hijinks scene; it is not that I have had no hijinks, but perhaps that the spring has been altogether too hijinksical to even be reported)
tuesday hijinks, no. 9: scenes from the Rochester Teen Book Festival. I wish I could send my teenage self a time machine so I could go to this thing. 
1. Cat Patrick, my co-presenter for the weekend. Forgotten is about to become my go-to recommend for teens. Ask her about the sign language troop she was in. Seriously, ask her. 
2. I’d say that a handmade “Holden Caulfield thinks you’re a phony” t-shirt is just about the perfect thing to wear to a teen book festival. 
3. Handmade book earrings. These Rochester Teen Book Festival attendees are seriously crafty.
4. Gran Torino. The authors were driven in classic cars to the event, and I’d really prefer to always be driven to events this way. The driver’s name I have forgotten, but he was a former shop teacher and an excellent guide. The profile belongs to James Kennedy, who travels with a tuxedo and is the shyest writer you will ever meet. 
4. A.S. King & Squid. I liked the both of them immediately. 
5. My answer was “A Kitten.” Melissa Walker’s answer was “Grace Kelly.” What was the question? 
6. The majestic head of Terry Trueman.
7. Jack Ferraiolo will kill you with his star. (I lost mine somewhere, by the way, but that is the way with stars.)
Thanks to all the incredible volunteers at the Rochester Teen Book Festival. This event somehow concentrates all that is good about writing for teenagers into a single day. I wish I had taken more pictures, but I am photographically-challenged.
P.S. I’ll be signing bright and early at BEA tomorrow for anyone who’s around.
Zoom Info
(more Tuesday hijinks on Monday after an extended absence from the hijinks scene; it is not that I have had no hijinks, but perhaps that the spring has been altogether too hijinksical to even be reported)
tuesday hijinks, no. 9: scenes from the Rochester Teen Book Festival. I wish I could send my teenage self a time machine so I could go to this thing. 
1. Cat Patrick, my co-presenter for the weekend. Forgotten is about to become my go-to recommend for teens. Ask her about the sign language troop she was in. Seriously, ask her. 
2. I’d say that a handmade “Holden Caulfield thinks you’re a phony” t-shirt is just about the perfect thing to wear to a teen book festival. 
3. Handmade book earrings. These Rochester Teen Book Festival attendees are seriously crafty.
4. Gran Torino. The authors were driven in classic cars to the event, and I’d really prefer to always be driven to events this way. The driver’s name I have forgotten, but he was a former shop teacher and an excellent guide. The profile belongs to James Kennedy, who travels with a tuxedo and is the shyest writer you will ever meet. 
4. A.S. King & Squid. I liked the both of them immediately. 
5. My answer was “A Kitten.” Melissa Walker’s answer was “Grace Kelly.” What was the question? 
6. The majestic head of Terry Trueman.
7. Jack Ferraiolo will kill you with his star. (I lost mine somewhere, by the way, but that is the way with stars.)
Thanks to all the incredible volunteers at the Rochester Teen Book Festival. This event somehow concentrates all that is good about writing for teenagers into a single day. I wish I had taken more pictures, but I am photographically-challenged.
P.S. I’ll be signing bright and early at BEA tomorrow for anyone who’s around.
Zoom Info
(more Tuesday hijinks on Monday after an extended absence from the hijinks scene; it is not that I have had no hijinks, but perhaps that the spring has been altogether too hijinksical to even be reported)
tuesday hijinks, no. 9: scenes from the Rochester Teen Book Festival. I wish I could send my teenage self a time machine so I could go to this thing. 
1. Cat Patrick, my co-presenter for the weekend. Forgotten is about to become my go-to recommend for teens. Ask her about the sign language troop she was in. Seriously, ask her. 
2. I’d say that a handmade “Holden Caulfield thinks you’re a phony” t-shirt is just about the perfect thing to wear to a teen book festival. 
3. Handmade book earrings. These Rochester Teen Book Festival attendees are seriously crafty.
4. Gran Torino. The authors were driven in classic cars to the event, and I’d really prefer to always be driven to events this way. The driver’s name I have forgotten, but he was a former shop teacher and an excellent guide. The profile belongs to James Kennedy, who travels with a tuxedo and is the shyest writer you will ever meet. 
4. A.S. King & Squid. I liked the both of them immediately. 
5. My answer was “A Kitten.” Melissa Walker’s answer was “Grace Kelly.” What was the question? 
6. The majestic head of Terry Trueman.
7. Jack Ferraiolo will kill you with his star. (I lost mine somewhere, by the way, but that is the way with stars.)
Thanks to all the incredible volunteers at the Rochester Teen Book Festival. This event somehow concentrates all that is good about writing for teenagers into a single day. I wish I had taken more pictures, but I am photographically-challenged.
P.S. I’ll be signing bright and early at BEA tomorrow for anyone who’s around.
Zoom Info
(more Tuesday hijinks on Monday after an extended absence from the hijinks scene; it is not that I have had no hijinks, but perhaps that the spring has been altogether too hijinksical to even be reported)
tuesday hijinks, no. 9: scenes from the Rochester Teen Book Festival. I wish I could send my teenage self a time machine so I could go to this thing. 
1. Cat Patrick, my co-presenter for the weekend. Forgotten is about to become my go-to recommend for teens. Ask her about the sign language troop she was in. Seriously, ask her. 
2. I’d say that a handmade “Holden Caulfield thinks you’re a phony” t-shirt is just about the perfect thing to wear to a teen book festival. 
3. Handmade book earrings. These Rochester Teen Book Festival attendees are seriously crafty.
4. Gran Torino. The authors were driven in classic cars to the event, and I’d really prefer to always be driven to events this way. The driver’s name I have forgotten, but he was a former shop teacher and an excellent guide. The profile belongs to James Kennedy, who travels with a tuxedo and is the shyest writer you will ever meet. 
4. A.S. King & Squid. I liked the both of them immediately. 
5. My answer was “A Kitten.” Melissa Walker’s answer was “Grace Kelly.” What was the question? 
6. The majestic head of Terry Trueman.
7. Jack Ferraiolo will kill you with his star. (I lost mine somewhere, by the way, but that is the way with stars.)
Thanks to all the incredible volunteers at the Rochester Teen Book Festival. This event somehow concentrates all that is good about writing for teenagers into a single day. I wish I had taken more pictures, but I am photographically-challenged.
P.S. I’ll be signing bright and early at BEA tomorrow for anyone who’s around.
Zoom Info
(more Tuesday hijinks on Monday after an extended absence from the hijinks scene; it is not that I have had no hijinks, but perhaps that the spring has been altogether too hijinksical to even be reported)
tuesday hijinks, no. 9: scenes from the Rochester Teen Book Festival. I wish I could send my teenage self a time machine so I could go to this thing. 
1. Cat Patrick, my co-presenter for the weekend. Forgotten is about to become my go-to recommend for teens. Ask her about the sign language troop she was in. Seriously, ask her. 
2. I’d say that a handmade “Holden Caulfield thinks you’re a phony” t-shirt is just about the perfect thing to wear to a teen book festival. 
3. Handmade book earrings. These Rochester Teen Book Festival attendees are seriously crafty.
4. Gran Torino. The authors were driven in classic cars to the event, and I’d really prefer to always be driven to events this way. The driver’s name I have forgotten, but he was a former shop teacher and an excellent guide. The profile belongs to James Kennedy, who travels with a tuxedo and is the shyest writer you will ever meet. 
4. A.S. King & Squid. I liked the both of them immediately. 
5. My answer was “A Kitten.” Melissa Walker’s answer was “Grace Kelly.” What was the question? 
6. The majestic head of Terry Trueman.
7. Jack Ferraiolo will kill you with his star. (I lost mine somewhere, by the way, but that is the way with stars.)
Thanks to all the incredible volunteers at the Rochester Teen Book Festival. This event somehow concentrates all that is good about writing for teenagers into a single day. I wish I had taken more pictures, but I am photographically-challenged.
P.S. I’ll be signing bright and early at BEA tomorrow for anyone who’s around.
Zoom Info
(more Tuesday hijinks on Monday after an extended absence from the hijinks scene; it is not that I have had no hijinks, but perhaps that the spring has been altogether too hijinksical to even be reported)
tuesday hijinks, no. 9: scenes from the Rochester Teen Book Festival. I wish I could send my teenage self a time machine so I could go to this thing. 
1. Cat Patrick, my co-presenter for the weekend. Forgotten is about to become my go-to recommend for teens. Ask her about the sign language troop she was in. Seriously, ask her. 
2. I’d say that a handmade “Holden Caulfield thinks you’re a phony” t-shirt is just about the perfect thing to wear to a teen book festival. 
3. Handmade book earrings. These Rochester Teen Book Festival attendees are seriously crafty.
4. Gran Torino. The authors were driven in classic cars to the event, and I’d really prefer to always be driven to events this way. The driver’s name I have forgotten, but he was a former shop teacher and an excellent guide. The profile belongs to James Kennedy, who travels with a tuxedo and is the shyest writer you will ever meet. 
4. A.S. King & Squid. I liked the both of them immediately. 
5. My answer was “A Kitten.” Melissa Walker’s answer was “Grace Kelly.” What was the question? 
6. The majestic head of Terry Trueman.
7. Jack Ferraiolo will kill you with his star. (I lost mine somewhere, by the way, but that is the way with stars.)
Thanks to all the incredible volunteers at the Rochester Teen Book Festival. This event somehow concentrates all that is good about writing for teenagers into a single day. I wish I had taken more pictures, but I am photographically-challenged.
P.S. I’ll be signing bright and early at BEA tomorrow for anyone who’s around.
Zoom Info
(more Tuesday hijinks on Monday after an extended absence from the hijinks scene; it is not that I have had no hijinks, but perhaps that the spring has been altogether too hijinksical to even be reported)
tuesday hijinks, no. 9: scenes from the Rochester Teen Book Festival. I wish I could send my teenage self a time machine so I could go to this thing. 
1. Cat Patrick, my co-presenter for the weekend. Forgotten is about to become my go-to recommend for teens. Ask her about the sign language troop she was in. Seriously, ask her. 
2. I’d say that a handmade “Holden Caulfield thinks you’re a phony” t-shirt is just about the perfect thing to wear to a teen book festival. 
3. Handmade book earrings. These Rochester Teen Book Festival attendees are seriously crafty.
4. Gran Torino. The authors were driven in classic cars to the event, and I’d really prefer to always be driven to events this way. The driver’s name I have forgotten, but he was a former shop teacher and an excellent guide. The profile belongs to James Kennedy, who travels with a tuxedo and is the shyest writer you will ever meet. 
4. A.S. King & Squid. I liked the both of them immediately. 
5. My answer was “A Kitten.” Melissa Walker’s answer was “Grace Kelly.” What was the question? 
6. The majestic head of Terry Trueman.
7. Jack Ferraiolo will kill you with his star. (I lost mine somewhere, by the way, but that is the way with stars.)
Thanks to all the incredible volunteers at the Rochester Teen Book Festival. This event somehow concentrates all that is good about writing for teenagers into a single day. I wish I had taken more pictures, but I am photographically-challenged.
P.S. I’ll be signing bright and early at BEA tomorrow for anyone who’s around.
Zoom Info

(more Tuesday hijinks on Monday after an extended absence from the hijinks scene; it is not that I have had no hijinks, but perhaps that the spring has been altogether too hijinksical to even be reported)

tuesday hijinks, no. 9: scenes from the Rochester Teen Book Festival. I wish I could send my teenage self a time machine so I could go to this thing.

1. Cat Patrick, my co-presenter for the weekend. Forgotten is about to become my go-to recommend for teens. Ask her about the sign language troop she was in. Seriously, ask her.

2. I’d say that a handmade “Holden Caulfield thinks you’re a phony” t-shirt is just about the perfect thing to wear to a teen book festival.

3. Handmade book earrings. These Rochester Teen Book Festival attendees are seriously crafty.

4. Gran Torino. The authors were driven in classic cars to the event, and I’d really prefer to always be driven to events this way. The driver’s name I have forgotten, but he was a former shop teacher and an excellent guide. The profile belongs to James Kennedy, who travels with a tuxedo and is the shyest writer you will ever meet.

4. A.S. King & Squid. I liked the both of them immediately.

5. My answer was “A Kitten.” Melissa Walker’s answer was “Grace Kelly.” What was the question?

6. The majestic head of Terry Trueman.

7. Jack Ferraiolo will kill you with his star. (I lost mine somewhere, by the way, but that is the way with stars.)

Thanks to all the incredible volunteers at the Rochester Teen Book Festival. This event somehow concentrates all that is good about writing for teenagers into a single day. I wish I had taken more pictures, but I am photographically-challenged.

P.S. I’ll be signing bright and early at BEA tomorrow for anyone who’s around.

tuesday hijinks no. 7: epigraph no. 1

The selection of an epigraph is a serious matter. Because It Is My Blood has two of them. The first, which you’ll find below, is a Stephen Crane poem, and the title of Because It Is My Blood is derived from the it:

In the desert
I saw a creature, naked, bestial,
Who, squatting upon the ground,
Held his heart in his hands,
And ate of it.
I said, “Is it good, friend?”
"It is bitter—bitter," he answered;
"But I like it
Because it is bitter,
And because it is my heart.”

Stephen Crane is certainly not my favorite poet nor is “In the Desert” my favorite poem by a mile - nay, a marathon. On some level, I’m not even sure I LIKE this poem.* Alas, it is the poem that most suits the book, Anya in the story, and probably my frame of mind at the time I was writing. 

————-

*My policy is not to criticize other writers online. However, Stephen Crane is long dead, so I feel I’m in the clear here. 

(Source: linguatech.com)

tuesday hijinks, no. 6: brief synopsis of Because It is My Blood, the sequel to All These Things I’ve Done, which comes out September 18, 2012. The story takes place partially in Oaxaca — isn’t Oaxaca pretty?








Because It Is My Blood



Every time I think I’m out, they pull me back in.”- Michael Corleone, The Godfather

Since her release from Liberty Children’s Facility, Anya Balanchine is determined to follow the straight and narrow. Unfortunately, her criminal record is making it hard for her to do that. No high school wants her with a gun possession charge on her rap sheet. Plus, all the people in her life have moved on: Natty has skipped two grades at Holy Trinity, Scarlet and Gable seem closer than ever, and even Win is in a new relationship. But when old friends return demanding that certain debts be paid, Anya is thrown right back into the criminal world that she had been determined to escape. It’s a journey that will take her across the ocean and straight into the heart of the birthplace of chocolate where her resolve—and her heart—will be tested as never before.








firsttimeuser:

tismark:
Street Scenes from Oaxaca
We were in Oaxaca about two days, but significant days, Dec 31st and Jan 1st. Pretty much all of my walking around the city photos are from New Year’s Day. I don’t know what the atmosphere of Oaxaca is like any other time of the year but I’m sure it’s a beautiful city no matter what. Looking back at my photos of Mexico, I very nearly booked a flight to see Oaxaca for New Years AGAIN - that would have been two years in a row. I went another direction but I still feel sure I’ll visit Oaxaca again one day.
About: Website / Photography Site / Travels / Twitter
Zoom Info
tuesday hijinks, no. 6: brief synopsis of Because It is My Blood, the sequel to All These Things I’ve Done, which comes out September 18, 2012. The story takes place partially in Oaxaca — isn’t Oaxaca pretty?








Because It Is My Blood



Every time I think I’m out, they pull me back in.”- Michael Corleone, The Godfather

Since her release from Liberty Children’s Facility, Anya Balanchine is determined to follow the straight and narrow. Unfortunately, her criminal record is making it hard for her to do that. No high school wants her with a gun possession charge on her rap sheet. Plus, all the people in her life have moved on: Natty has skipped two grades at Holy Trinity, Scarlet and Gable seem closer than ever, and even Win is in a new relationship. But when old friends return demanding that certain debts be paid, Anya is thrown right back into the criminal world that she had been determined to escape. It’s a journey that will take her across the ocean and straight into the heart of the birthplace of chocolate where her resolve—and her heart—will be tested as never before.








firsttimeuser:

tismark:
Street Scenes from Oaxaca
We were in Oaxaca about two days, but significant days, Dec 31st and Jan 1st. Pretty much all of my walking around the city photos are from New Year’s Day. I don’t know what the atmosphere of Oaxaca is like any other time of the year but I’m sure it’s a beautiful city no matter what. Looking back at my photos of Mexico, I very nearly booked a flight to see Oaxaca for New Years AGAIN - that would have been two years in a row. I went another direction but I still feel sure I’ll visit Oaxaca again one day.
About: Website / Photography Site / Travels / Twitter
Zoom Info
tuesday hijinks, no. 6: brief synopsis of Because It is My Blood, the sequel to All These Things I’ve Done, which comes out September 18, 2012. The story takes place partially in Oaxaca — isn’t Oaxaca pretty?








Because It Is My Blood



Every time I think I’m out, they pull me back in.”- Michael Corleone, The Godfather

Since her release from Liberty Children’s Facility, Anya Balanchine is determined to follow the straight and narrow. Unfortunately, her criminal record is making it hard for her to do that. No high school wants her with a gun possession charge on her rap sheet. Plus, all the people in her life have moved on: Natty has skipped two grades at Holy Trinity, Scarlet and Gable seem closer than ever, and even Win is in a new relationship. But when old friends return demanding that certain debts be paid, Anya is thrown right back into the criminal world that she had been determined to escape. It’s a journey that will take her across the ocean and straight into the heart of the birthplace of chocolate where her resolve—and her heart—will be tested as never before.








firsttimeuser:

tismark:
Street Scenes from Oaxaca
We were in Oaxaca about two days, but significant days, Dec 31st and Jan 1st. Pretty much all of my walking around the city photos are from New Year’s Day. I don’t know what the atmosphere of Oaxaca is like any other time of the year but I’m sure it’s a beautiful city no matter what. Looking back at my photos of Mexico, I very nearly booked a flight to see Oaxaca for New Years AGAIN - that would have been two years in a row. I went another direction but I still feel sure I’ll visit Oaxaca again one day.
About: Website / Photography Site / Travels / Twitter
Zoom Info
tuesday hijinks, no. 6: brief synopsis of Because It is My Blood, the sequel to All These Things I’ve Done, which comes out September 18, 2012. The story takes place partially in Oaxaca — isn’t Oaxaca pretty?








Because It Is My Blood



Every time I think I’m out, they pull me back in.”- Michael Corleone, The Godfather

Since her release from Liberty Children’s Facility, Anya Balanchine is determined to follow the straight and narrow. Unfortunately, her criminal record is making it hard for her to do that. No high school wants her with a gun possession charge on her rap sheet. Plus, all the people in her life have moved on: Natty has skipped two grades at Holy Trinity, Scarlet and Gable seem closer than ever, and even Win is in a new relationship. But when old friends return demanding that certain debts be paid, Anya is thrown right back into the criminal world that she had been determined to escape. It’s a journey that will take her across the ocean and straight into the heart of the birthplace of chocolate where her resolve—and her heart—will be tested as never before.








firsttimeuser:

tismark:
Street Scenes from Oaxaca
We were in Oaxaca about two days, but significant days, Dec 31st and Jan 1st. Pretty much all of my walking around the city photos are from New Year’s Day. I don’t know what the atmosphere of Oaxaca is like any other time of the year but I’m sure it’s a beautiful city no matter what. Looking back at my photos of Mexico, I very nearly booked a flight to see Oaxaca for New Years AGAIN - that would have been two years in a row. I went another direction but I still feel sure I’ll visit Oaxaca again one day.
About: Website / Photography Site / Travels / Twitter
Zoom Info

tuesday hijinks, no. 6: brief synopsis of Because It is My Blood, the sequel to All These Things I’ve Done, which comes out September 18, 2012. The story takes place partially in Oaxaca — isn’t Oaxaca pretty?

Because It Is My Blood

Every time I think I’m out, they pull me back in.”- Michael Corleone, The Godfather

Since her release from Liberty Children’s Facility, Anya Balanchine is determined to follow the straight and narrow. Unfortunately, her criminal record is making it hard for her to do that. No high school wants her with a gun possession charge on her rap sheet. Plus, all the people in her life have moved on: Natty has skipped two grades at Holy Trinity, Scarlet and Gable seem closer than ever, and even Win is in a new relationship. But when old friends return demanding that certain debts be paid, Anya is thrown right back into the criminal world that she had been determined to escape. It’s a journey that will take her across the ocean and straight into the heart of the birthplace of chocolate where her resolve—and her heart—will be tested as never before.

firsttimeuser:

tismark:

Street Scenes from Oaxaca

We were in Oaxaca about two days, but significant days, Dec 31st and Jan 1st. Pretty much all of my walking around the city photos are from New Year’s Day. I don’t know what the atmosphere of Oaxaca is like any other time of the year but I’m sure it’s a beautiful city no matter what. Looking back at my photos of Mexico, I very nearly booked a flight to see Oaxaca for New Years AGAIN - that would have been two years in a row. I went another direction but I still feel sure I’ll visit Oaxaca again one day.

About: Website / Photography Site / Travels / Twitter

(Source: tismark)

Tuesday Hijinks, No. 4:  An interview with me about the paperback version of All These Things I’ve Done and title reveal for the second book.

Something I wanted to put in the interview but didn’t. All the titles of the books in the series add up to form a synopsis of the series. At this point, you have half the sentence: All these things I’ve done because it is my blood… etc. 

P.S. The jacket on my tumblr is - I believe - the final version; it’s a little bit different than the one on BookPage.

annohreog-deactivated20131105 asked:

Hi, I like your books -- esp. Elsewhere. A nosy question... A while ago I remember reading on your webpage that you don't exactly dislike "annoyingly-social" YA writers, but it's the Web presence/marketing-ness that made you uncomfortable, as if it obliged you to go out and hustle. (or something like that). It's been a while since you wrote it, and I was wondering, after more years in the biz, did this change? Only asking, as that little comment quite comforted the loner in me...

I answered:

This is going to be a multi-part answer.

1) In the last year or so, I have made peace with being online. I want people to read my books; being online seems to be an aspect of the job of author these days. 

2) On the other hand, I think it’s sad that people can’t experience books separate from writers anymore. It’s worth noting that “liking an author” is not at all the same thing as “liking a novel” - and yet I’m not sure many young readers bother to note the difference. And when we make our book-buying decisions based on an author being, say, “funny on twitter,” we are not necessarily buying the best books. Books should not be tribute gifts because authors are amusing. There are several deeply amusing people on Twitter who write boring, pedestrian novels. 

3) The flip side again: Just because an author is antisocial doesn’t mean his/her books aren’t beautiful/wonderful/life-changing/amazing. Authors are not always their books. (And books are sometimes more interesting than tweets.)

4) I am still a loner and I still struggle with all of this. I sometimes wish I weren’t online at all. I think, for instance, I am adding nothing to twitter except “sound and fury signifying nothing.” (emphasis on nothing)… I still believe in deliberation and reflection before airing an opinion for the world to see. (The reason I like tumblr, by the way, is because I am impressed by  the variety of interests and deep curatorial skill you see on it.)

5) On the other hand — that’s my third hand — I like communicating with readers. I like being able to say thank you to those who have enjoyed my books and chosen to tell me so in a thoughtful manner.

6)  And so I’m trying to stop fighting everything. I take a deep breath and remind myself of the E.M. Forster quote: “only connect.” 

My Last Book Tour as Depicted in a Series of Angsty Photographs of Hotel Occasional Chairs
Top Row: Houston, Hotel Sorella
Middle Row, L to R: Austin, Embassy Suites; Naperville, Hotel Arista; Denver, Sheraton
Bottom Row, L to R: Pasadena 1, Westin; Pasadena 2, Westin; Seattle, Pan Pacific
And below, a bit from a poem I adore, “Love After Love” by Derek Walcott:

Take down the love letters from the bookshelf, 
the photographs, the desperate notes, 
peel your own image from the mirror.
 Sit. Feast on your life.

Here’s a link to Derek Walcott, Collected Poems, 1948-1984. Buy it, young writer. Read the whole thing VERY SLOWLY. You can thank me later. 
Zoom Info
My Last Book Tour as Depicted in a Series of Angsty Photographs of Hotel Occasional Chairs
Top Row: Houston, Hotel Sorella
Middle Row, L to R: Austin, Embassy Suites; Naperville, Hotel Arista; Denver, Sheraton
Bottom Row, L to R: Pasadena 1, Westin; Pasadena 2, Westin; Seattle, Pan Pacific
And below, a bit from a poem I adore, “Love After Love” by Derek Walcott:

Take down the love letters from the bookshelf, 
the photographs, the desperate notes, 
peel your own image from the mirror.
 Sit. Feast on your life.

Here’s a link to Derek Walcott, Collected Poems, 1948-1984. Buy it, young writer. Read the whole thing VERY SLOWLY. You can thank me later. 
Zoom Info
My Last Book Tour as Depicted in a Series of Angsty Photographs of Hotel Occasional Chairs
Top Row: Houston, Hotel Sorella
Middle Row, L to R: Austin, Embassy Suites; Naperville, Hotel Arista; Denver, Sheraton
Bottom Row, L to R: Pasadena 1, Westin; Pasadena 2, Westin; Seattle, Pan Pacific
And below, a bit from a poem I adore, “Love After Love” by Derek Walcott:

Take down the love letters from the bookshelf, 
the photographs, the desperate notes, 
peel your own image from the mirror.
 Sit. Feast on your life.

Here’s a link to Derek Walcott, Collected Poems, 1948-1984. Buy it, young writer. Read the whole thing VERY SLOWLY. You can thank me later. 
Zoom Info
My Last Book Tour as Depicted in a Series of Angsty Photographs of Hotel Occasional Chairs
Top Row: Houston, Hotel Sorella
Middle Row, L to R: Austin, Embassy Suites; Naperville, Hotel Arista; Denver, Sheraton
Bottom Row, L to R: Pasadena 1, Westin; Pasadena 2, Westin; Seattle, Pan Pacific
And below, a bit from a poem I adore, “Love After Love” by Derek Walcott:

Take down the love letters from the bookshelf, 
the photographs, the desperate notes, 
peel your own image from the mirror.
 Sit. Feast on your life.

Here’s a link to Derek Walcott, Collected Poems, 1948-1984. Buy it, young writer. Read the whole thing VERY SLOWLY. You can thank me later. 
Zoom Info
My Last Book Tour as Depicted in a Series of Angsty Photographs of Hotel Occasional Chairs
Top Row: Houston, Hotel Sorella
Middle Row, L to R: Austin, Embassy Suites; Naperville, Hotel Arista; Denver, Sheraton
Bottom Row, L to R: Pasadena 1, Westin; Pasadena 2, Westin; Seattle, Pan Pacific
And below, a bit from a poem I adore, “Love After Love” by Derek Walcott:

Take down the love letters from the bookshelf, 
the photographs, the desperate notes, 
peel your own image from the mirror.
 Sit. Feast on your life.

Here’s a link to Derek Walcott, Collected Poems, 1948-1984. Buy it, young writer. Read the whole thing VERY SLOWLY. You can thank me later. 
Zoom Info
My Last Book Tour as Depicted in a Series of Angsty Photographs of Hotel Occasional Chairs
Top Row: Houston, Hotel Sorella
Middle Row, L to R: Austin, Embassy Suites; Naperville, Hotel Arista; Denver, Sheraton
Bottom Row, L to R: Pasadena 1, Westin; Pasadena 2, Westin; Seattle, Pan Pacific
And below, a bit from a poem I adore, “Love After Love” by Derek Walcott:

Take down the love letters from the bookshelf, 
the photographs, the desperate notes, 
peel your own image from the mirror.
 Sit. Feast on your life.

Here’s a link to Derek Walcott, Collected Poems, 1948-1984. Buy it, young writer. Read the whole thing VERY SLOWLY. You can thank me later. 
Zoom Info
My Last Book Tour as Depicted in a Series of Angsty Photographs of Hotel Occasional Chairs
Top Row: Houston, Hotel Sorella
Middle Row, L to R: Austin, Embassy Suites; Naperville, Hotel Arista; Denver, Sheraton
Bottom Row, L to R: Pasadena 1, Westin; Pasadena 2, Westin; Seattle, Pan Pacific
And below, a bit from a poem I adore, “Love After Love” by Derek Walcott:

Take down the love letters from the bookshelf, 
the photographs, the desperate notes, 
peel your own image from the mirror.
 Sit. Feast on your life.

Here’s a link to Derek Walcott, Collected Poems, 1948-1984. Buy it, young writer. Read the whole thing VERY SLOWLY. You can thank me later. 
Zoom Info

My Last Book Tour as Depicted in a Series of Angsty Photographs of Hotel Occasional Chairs

Top Row: Houston, Hotel Sorella

Middle Row, L to R: Austin, Embassy Suites; Naperville, Hotel Arista; Denver, Sheraton

Bottom Row, L to R: Pasadena 1, Westin; Pasadena 2, Westin; Seattle, Pan Pacific

And below, a bit from a poem I adore, “Love After Love” by Derek Walcott:

Take down the love letters from the bookshelf,

the photographs, the desperate notes,

peel your own image from the mirror.

Sit. Feast on your life.

Here’s a link to Derek Walcott, Collected Poems, 1948-1984. Buy it, young writer. Read the whole thing VERY SLOWLY. You can thank me later. 

The latest from Dear Writer. Say, why not write us a letter yourself? And while I’m making requests, you really should check out Carolyn Mackler’s excellent contribution to the Dear Bully anthology. 
dearwriter:

Dear Carolyn, What gets you to respond to a reader’s letter? (And the reverse - what makes you not respond?) I’m so bad about replying to reader mail that sometimes it seems hopeless to even start. This one caught my eye because it’s rare to get an actual “old school” typewriter page. I also liked the breezy writing style and colorful vocabulary. XO, Gabrielle P.S. I read your chapter in DEAR BULLY while waiting to do an event at Vroman’s in Pasadena. It was wonderful.
Zoom Info
The latest from Dear Writer. Say, why not write us a letter yourself? And while I’m making requests, you really should check out Carolyn Mackler’s excellent contribution to the Dear Bully anthology. 
dearwriter:

Dear Carolyn, What gets you to respond to a reader’s letter? (And the reverse - what makes you not respond?) I’m so bad about replying to reader mail that sometimes it seems hopeless to even start. This one caught my eye because it’s rare to get an actual “old school” typewriter page. I also liked the breezy writing style and colorful vocabulary. XO, Gabrielle P.S. I read your chapter in DEAR BULLY while waiting to do an event at Vroman’s in Pasadena. It was wonderful.
Zoom Info

The latest from Dear Writer. Say, why not write us a letter yourself? And while I’m making requests, you really should check out Carolyn Mackler’s excellent contribution to the Dear Bully anthology. 

dearwriter:

Dear Carolyn, What gets you to respond to a reader’s letter? (And the reverse - what makes you not respond?) I’m so bad about replying to reader mail that sometimes it seems hopeless to even start. This one caught my eye because it’s rare to get an actual “old school” typewriter page. I also liked the breezy writing style and colorful vocabulary. XO, Gabrielle P.S. I read your chapter in DEAR BULLY while waiting to do an event at Vroman’s in Pasadena. It was wonderful.

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