gabrielle zevin

writer

more

Gabrielle Zevin has published six novels. Her debut, Margarettown, was a selection of the Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers program. The Hole We’re In was on Entertainment Weekly's Must List and was a New York Times Editor’s Choice. Entertainment Weekly wrote, "Every day newspaper articles chronicle families battered by the recession, circling the drain in unemployment and debt or scraping by with minimum-wage jobs. But no novel has truly captured that struggle until now." Publishers Weekly called the novel "a Corrections for our recessionary times."

Of all her books, she is probably best known for the young adult novel Elsewhere. Elsewhere, an American Library Association Notable Children’s Book, was nominated for a Quill Award and received the Borders Original Voices Award. The book has been translated into over twenty languages. Of Elsewhere, the New York Times Book Review wrote, “Every so often a book comes along with a premise so fresh and arresting it seems to exist in a category all its own... Elsewhere, by Gabrielle Zevin, is such a book.”

She is the screenwriter of Conversations with Other Women (Helena Bonham Carter, Aaron Eckhart) for which she received an Independent Spirit Award Nomination. In 2009, she and director Hans Canosa adapted her novel Memoirs of a Teenage Amnesiac (ALA Best Books for Young Adults) into the Japanese film, Dareka ga Watashi ni Kiss wo Shita. She has also written for the New York Times Book Review and NPR’s All Things Considered. She began her writing career at age fourteen as a music critic for the Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel.

Zevin is a graduate of Harvard University. After many years on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, she recently moved to Silver Lake, Los Angeles.

Find her online at gabriellezevin.com.

Close

Blog

Previous Next

Posts tagged thursday chocolate

thursday chocolate, no. 8: this one’s about coffee, which frequent readers of my various ramblings will know I prefer to chocolate anyway. According to this piece on NPR, Sultan Murad IV, a ruler of the Ottoman Empire, used to decapitate people for drinking coffee!

Other interesting bits:

"If you look at the rhetoric about drugs that we’re dealing with now — like, say, crack — it’s very similar to what was said about coffee," Stewart Allen, author of The Devil’s Cup: Coffee, the Driving Force in History, tells The SaltIn Murad’s Istanbul, religious leaders preached on street corners that coffee would inspire indecent behavior. As the bean moved west into Europe, physicians rallied against it, claiming that coffee would “dry up the cerebrospinal fluid” and cause paralysis.

But apparently the motivation was really political:

Monarchs and tyrants publicly argued that coffee was poison for the bodies and souls of their subjects, but Mark Pendergrast — author of Uncommon Grounds: The History of Coffee and How It Transformed Our World — says their real concern was political. 

 "Coffee has a tendency to loosen people’s imaginations … and mouths," he tells The Salt.

And inventive, chatty citizens scare dictators.

According to one story, an Ottoman Grand Vizier secretly visited a coffeehouse in Istanbul.

"He observed that the people drinking alcohol would just get drunk and sing and be jolly, whereas the people drinking coffee remained sober and plotted against the government," says Allen.

British anti-coffee manifesto from the 17th century:


npr:

Drink Coffee? Off With Your Head!

Most folks who resolved to cut down on coffee this year are driven by the simple desire for self-improvement.

But for coffee drinkers in 17th-century Turkey, there was a much more concrete motivating force: a big guy with a sword.

Sultan Murad IV, a ruler of the Ottoman Empire, would not have been a fan of Starbucks. Under his rule, the consumption of coffee was a capital offense.

The sultan was so intent on eradicating coffee that he would disguise himself as a commoner and stalk the streets of Istanbul with a hundred-pound broadsword. Unfortunate coffee drinkers were decapitated as they sipped.

Murad IV’s successor was more lenient. The punishment for a first offense was a light cudgeling. Caught with coffee a second time, the perpetrator was sewn into a leather bag and tossed in the river.

But people still drank coffee. Even with the sultan at the front door with a sword and the executioner at the back door with a sewing kit, they still wanted their daily cup of joe. And that’s the history of coffee in a bean skin: Old habits die hard. —Adam Cole

Want to read my new book before it’s out in September? Goodreads is giving away 10 ARCs of All These Things I’ve Done. 
On a semi-related note, here I am with a book jacket-inspired cupcake my mom* made. Doesn’t it look delicious? It was! Peanut butter frosting, but the heart and the cupcake itself are chocolate, of course. (Aside to my friend Carolyn, if she’s reading this: Yes, I am talking about cupcakes on the Internet. What is it with the cupcakes?) 
*That’s her in the background. She is shaving Halvah. Halvah is also delicious, but should not be confused with challah.
Zoom Info
Want to read my new book before it’s out in September? Goodreads is giving away 10 ARCs of All These Things I’ve Done. 
On a semi-related note, here I am with a book jacket-inspired cupcake my mom* made. Doesn’t it look delicious? It was! Peanut butter frosting, but the heart and the cupcake itself are chocolate, of course. (Aside to my friend Carolyn, if she’s reading this: Yes, I am talking about cupcakes on the Internet. What is it with the cupcakes?) 
*That’s her in the background. She is shaving Halvah. Halvah is also delicious, but should not be confused with challah.
Zoom Info

Want to read my new book before it’s out in September? Goodreads is giving away 10 ARCs of All These Things I’ve Done. 

On a semi-related note, here I am with a book jacket-inspired cupcake my mom* made. Doesn’t it look delicious? It was! Peanut butter frosting, but the heart and the cupcake itself are chocolate, of course. (Aside to my friend Carolyn, if she’s reading this: Yes, I am talking about cupcakes on the Internet. What is it with the cupcakes?

*That’s her in the background. She is shaving Halvah. Halvah is also delicious, but should not be confused with challah.

Back to Top

Twitter

Previous Next
Back to Top

Likes

Previous Next
Back to Top

Questions?

Previous Next
Back to Top

Instagram

Previous Next
Load More Photos
Back to Top

Vanity by Pixel Union